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Spurn The Burn – by Claire Newton...

Burnout is characterised by physical and emotional exhaustion – usually as a result of too much work. Many people experience burnout without even realising it, and only know something’s wrong when their symptoms become severe enough to significantly interfere with their work and family life. How at risk of Burnout are you, and what can you do to help yourself? What is Burnout? The short, simple answer is that burnout is a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion, usually as a result of too much work or frequent frustration at work. The more complex answeris that burnout is a negative reaction to stress at work with psychological, physiological and behavioural effects. Burnout appears to be a major factor in low worker morale, high absenteeism and job turnover rates, physical illness and distress, increased alcohol and drug use, marital and family conflict, and various psychological problems. How do I Know I have Burnout? The symptoms of burnout include the following: Changed job performance Increased absenteeism, tardiness, use of sick leave, and decreased efficiency or productivity – working more but enjoying it less. Increased overtime and no holiday leave Feeling indispensable to the organisation and reluctant to say no to working on scheduled off-days. Skipping rest and food breaks Continually having no time for coffee or lunch breaks to restore stamina. Social withdrawal Pulling away from co-workers, friends and family members, finding it difficult to confide in others. Self-medication Increased use of alcohol, tranquilisers and other mood-altering drugs.  Increased physical complaints Fatigue, irritability, muscle tension, frequent headaches, stomach upsets, susceptibility to illness, loss of pleasure in sex, insomnia. Emotional changes Emotional exhaustion, loss of self-esteem, depression, frustration, a ‘trapped’ feeling, pessimism, paranoia, rigidity, callousness, feelings of loneliness and guilt, and difficulty in making and explaining decisions. It is important to note...

9 Ways to Design Brand You – Corporate Image by Haydee Antezana...

You are the CEO of your own company – YOU Incorporated. In today’s fast-paced, competitive and interconnected world it is vital to have a unique powerful and personal brand in order to stand out and be memorable in the eyes of others. Think of some of the world’s most commanding personal brands…Oprah, Nelson Mandela, Richard Branson. These individuals have worked long and hard to establish powerful personal brands. How hard have you worked at managing the brand called YOU? Here are 9 ways to design the unique brand YOU. 1. Discover and define your brand What do you want to be known for? Your brand must be authentic and reflect your personality, values and vision. Write down your mission (what you do) and vision (what you can do-your promise) and set your goals. Select 3 descriptive words you want people to think of when they think of you. Professional, passionate, authentic. This is your brand identity-what people will remember you by. You are your best marketing tool 2. Develop your brand Companies spend millions on branding and marketing and ensuring they are ahead of their competitors, you too need to develop YOUR BRAND to stay ahead of the rest. Identify your strengths and talents and invest in them. If you want to be known for being accurate and detailed then request jobs or tasks that highlight these skills and this will bring those attributes to the attention of others. If it is being warm and empathetic, nurture this to draw others to you. If it is being articulate, go on a presentation course to hone this. Decide how you are going to package your brand in all that you do, wear surround yourself with-clothing, etiquette. 3. Do a BRAND...

6 Of The Best Marketing Strategies for 2014 by Donna Rachelson...

Marketing for marketing’s sake is a waste of time. Marketing needs to deliver results for your business. Instead of doing what you’ve been doing in 2013, or just putting aside a budget for marketing without really thinking about your marketing strategy for the next year, make sure that your marketing will have maximum business impact by implementing these six strategies: 1. Identify and specify exactly what your marketing needs to deliver for 2014. Develop the objectives and ensure there is buy in from the management team. Be specific. “Raise awareness about our new product” is far too general. “Increase the number of hits on our website’s new product page by 20%” is far more specific, which means you’re able to better plan towards achieving this goal. That in turn means you are more likely to hit your target. 2. Based on your objectives, define key measurements. Identify three or four measures in your business that you can track consistently to ensure you are making progress in achieving your marketing objectives. 3. Determine three or four main marketing initiatives for the year. Many people try to do too much. You may find that you have a list of great marketing ideas, but by pursuing all of them, you might actually be shooting yourself in the foot. Don’t dilute your budget by doing too much. Identify the three or four top initiatives and disregard the rest. Focus on getting the projects that you commit to working perfectly, instead of spreading your resources across too many activities and doing them half-heartedly. 4. Don’t just follow the pack. Remember that age-old parental response to “but everyone else is doing it”: “If everyone else jumped off a bridge would you do that too?” Often...

8 Ways to Successful Personal – Branding Corporate Image...

“Everyone has a Personal Brand but most people are not aware of this and do not manage this strategically, consistently, and effectively. You should take control of your brand and the message it sends and affect how others perceive you. This will help you to actively grow and distinguish yourself as an exceptional professional.” – Dr. Hubert Rampersad 1. Be authentic: Be your own Brand! You are your own boss, you are the CEO of you. Build your brand on your true personality, it should reflect your character, behaviour, values and vision. It should be aligned with your personal ambition! 2. Integrity: Stick to the moral and behavioural code set down by your personal ambition. 3. Be Consistent: Be consistent in your behaviour, this takes courage. Can others always depend on you? Are you doing relevant things again and again and again? Are you known for something in particular like always having a tidy, organised desk? 4. Specialisation: Focus on one area in particular, be precise and concentrate on a single core talent or unique skill. Being a generalist without any specialised skills, abilities or talents will not make you unique and memorable. 5. Be distinct: Distinguish yourself based on your brand. Your brand needs to be expressed in a unique way that is different from that of the competition and it needs to add value to others. It needs to be clearly defined so that its audience (clients, employers, colleagues) can quickly grasp what is stands for. 6. Relevance: What you stand for and brand yourself as should connect to what your target audience considers to be important. 7. Visibility: You need to broadcast your brand over and over again, continuously, consistently and repeatedly until it is memorable in the minds of...

Clarity a key driver for business success by Donna Rachelson...

The question has been asked many times: “What is it that makes some people successful in business?” I believe that clarity is a vital ingredient to career success. The Oxford Dictionary defines clarity as: “the quality of being clear, in particular: the quality of being coherent and intelligible; the quality of being easy to see or hear; or the quality of being certain or definite.” When I talk about clarity, I mean being clear and coherent about your goals, making sure that other people find them easy to understand, and being certain about what your personal brand stands for and where you want to go. In order to drive your career forward, you need clarity about the following four areas: Clarity about who you are. What makes you tick? What motivates you? What are your great passions and are you doing the work you love? When you understand who you are and why certain things work well for you and others don’t, it’s much easier to come up with decisive goals and work towards achieving them. Clarity about where you want to be. You need a crystal clear vision of what success looks like in your career and the path you need to take to get where you want to be. That way, you can make clear decisions on which activities will get you closer to your goals, and which are wasting your time and using your energy fruitlessly. Clarity about your USP. You need to identify your unique selling proposition – your competitive advantage and what makes you distinctive from your peers with similar experience and qualifications to you. This is central to building your personal brand and marketing it to unlock new workplace opportunities. Clarity about key...

5 Tips to Manage Your Online Brand – Corporate Image by Haydee Antezana...

Your online brand reputation is made up of what people can find about you when they tap your name into a search. In today’s interconnected world your online brand is just as important as your offline brand. Your online brand must correlate with the brand you project in person. Do you know that: • 48% of recruiters and HR professionals refer to personal websites when deciding whether to hire YOU • 63% of recruiters check social media sites to find out more about potential employees • 8% of companies have fired someone for abusing social media Here are 5 tips to help you manage your online brand: 1. Search for yourself When was the last time you Googled yourself? Google your name frequently to make sure you know what is being said about you. Try these free services that can notify you when your name appears online-Google Alerts (Google.com/alerts) and for Twitter, Topsy.com. Do you know people now do business through “word of mouth?” Search Google images to make sure there are no inappropriate photos of you…e.g. posing in provocative gestures, guzzling down beer at a beer contest, etc…If you do find anything offensive –remove the photos or ask friends to do so if they have posted it. 2. Make your profiles work for you, not against you Make sure your brand is consistent across all your social media accounts. Include a professional looking photograph and well-written biography. On Facebook go to your Account Settings to manage how you want to be tagged in a post. 3. Think before you post Familiarise yourself with your company’s social media policy and guidelines. Gossiping about your colleagues or your company on social media is an absolute no-no and could result in you...

Get Personal by Donna Rachelson...

If you want your brand to stand out, cut out the text messages where it relates to relationship building Because I’m passionate about personal branding, I tend to see regular opportunities for personal brand-building and marketing in my daily life. The occasion of my birthday in early January was no exception. While I was overwhelmed by the number of SMSes and Facebook messages I received, two things really fascinated me: Firstly, some people whom I know really well, chose to SMS or Whatsapp me to wish me happy birthday instead of calling to speak to me. And secondly, many of the messages on Facebook were the same – just “Happy Birthday”. That was it, nothing more. The key insight for me was that those who did something different really stood out. I believe that standing out in a positive way is always an opportunity to build your personal brand, and you should grab such chances with both hands. The best part of my birthday was receiving phone calls and meeting up with people who insisted on seeing me on my special day. “Standing out in a positive way is always an opportunity to build your personal brand, and you should grab such chances with both hands.” The lesson here is simple: if you want your brand to stand out, then cut out the text messages when the communication relates to relationship building. There is no better way to build a relationship than face to face or with a personal phone call. It demonstrates that because the person is truly important to you, you’ve taken time out of your busy schedule to make time for them. Marketing is a contact sport and while making contact is key, making contact in...

When is Casual Too Casual – Corporate Image by Haydee Antezana...

Does casual Fridays mean party on the bottom & business on top? Not quite… Every company varies in their Casual Dress Code policy- the main point to remember when getting dressed for Casual Friday- is that you are an ambassador for your company and what it represents. The dress code for Casual Friday is actually called Casual Smart. “So…” you may be asking “what do I wear?” When you look at yourself in the mirror your outfit should say 70% casual, 30% smart. Here are some examples… Casual Clothing Cues Colours are brighter; prints are bigger -bolder; styles of clothes less structured. More detail on garments such as stitching, pockets and pleats. Bolder costume jewellery and lower heeled shoes can be worn. For more cues – see visuals below. Women: • Capri Pants, paired with a collared blouse; crisp cotton t-shirts or cardi-cami combination with jeans. Men: •Golf shirt worn with denims; Soft – collared shirt paired with khaki’s. Both: •Always keep a smart-looking jacket with you in case you need to dress up your outfit at a moments notice. •Should jeans be allowed-choose a dark indigo or black jean in a classic cut. Casual Caution These are general cautionary guidelines to ensure you don’t tarnish your personal and company brand. Women: •Cling-wrap type clothing – dressing one or two sizes too small •Over-detailed and decorated tops – large bows, ruffles, slogans •Revealing clothing items (short skirts, plunging necklines) •Sheer, see-through fabrics •Shoe string, strappy tops or dresses •Vests, cropped, tank tops •Leggings or shorts •Low rise pants/skirts •Gym wear: tracksuits, sweat pants •Revealing/wrong colour underwear •Too many colours/prints worn in one outfit •Accessories that are too large, too noisy, too plastic •Slip-on sandals– people must not hear you...

Impactful first impressions by Donna Rachelson...

It’s widely accepted that first impressions are vital. In fact, you brand yourself within the first seven seconds of meeting someone. After that, it is very difficult to change someone’s impression of you. Research suggests that if you make a positive first impression, you need to mess up four times before someone changes his or her mind about you. If, however, you make a poor impression, you need seven further positive encounters to undo the negative first encounter. That’s why it’s important to focus on making a good first impression. But this doesn’t mean you need to stop making an effort after the first meeting. You need to ensure you keep building the other person’s perceptions of you in the most positive way possible. If you believe you have made a good first impression, what’s the next step? What am I doing consistently to reinforce and embed how I want to be perceived? Remember that consistency is critical to building a strong personal brand. The question you should ask yourself is, “What am I doing consistently to reinforce and embed how I want to be perceived?” Think very carefully after meeting someone for the first time how you can make the second, third and fourth impression really count. Think also about how you follow up — the extent to which it reinforces what your personal brand stands for and how you want to be perceived. What is it that you want people to be thinking about you after they have interacted with your personal brand? Perhaps you want to be known as innovative, proactive, solution-oriented or strategic. What can you do to demonstrate those qualities at the next meeting, and during your follow-up activities? If you have a good...

Lorraine Jenks – Walking a Greener Talk...

Lorraine Jenks Founder of www.hotelstuff.co.za and www.greenstuff.co.za Tireless activist and thought leader in advocating greener operating and procurement standards in homes, offices, factories, agriculture, hotels and tourism for the past 21 years. Teacher, intrepid traveller and witness to the critical need for more responsible practices.  Erstwhile hippie drawn to working with environmentalists in California in the 1970s.   Contracts Manager for Africa’s largest hotel chain for 15 years.  Went solo and completed training on Green Interior Design through the Green Building Council.  Trained for both the EU Flower Eco Label Standards and the National Cleaner Production Centre under the auspices of the United Nations Environmental Programme. Lorraine Jenk’s presentation will be on: Walking a Greener Talk The international trend towards more sustainable (or other tired cliché) business practices is becoming mainstream – often driven by tourism.  Demand for certified green destinations and venues is already evident in some regions.  Lorraine will share her expertise in explaining the why, what and how to go green; define what constitutes a Green Function and tell you how to be Greenish Speaker and a Responsible...

Alan Stevens – How to be a Virtual Speaker...

Cape Chapter Report Back – January 2014 Alan Stevens was the guest speaker at our Cape Chapter event in January. Of course, it was not possible at this stage to have Alan appear in person, but he beautifully demonstrated his topic by addressing us via Skype. And his topic was – How to be a Virtual Speaker. The content in this video of around 24 minutes, is essential viewing for any speaker wanting to keep up with modern communication and to take speaking opportunities that might not otherwise be available. As the Media Coach, Alan has extensive experience in both traditional media as well as social media, and his professionalism and insights make this a very entertaining video. Besides this video, I encourage you to have a look at his site and sign up for either the weekly podcast (radio show) or the newsletter. This is content you will anticipate each week with gladness. Report: Charlotte Kemp On a technical note, this is how the event was set up: Alan came to us on Skype using the venue’s wifi. The computer was connected to a larger computer screen, rather than being projected to a full screen, mostly because we had a smallish audience gathered around the table. The recording of the video was done – wait for it – on a cell phone placed in a mini cell phone tripod (about R100 in cell phone stores). You can see the angle of the computer screen and the PSASA banner behind it. The editing was done with free software available on either PCs or Macs – this one was a...

What can you expect to get from being a PSASA member?...

by Clive Simpkins SASHof, SdPFA 1. You’ll have a great opportunity to become part of the GSF (Global Speakers Federation) as an automatic part of your PSASA membership. You’ll also become part of the global NSA ‘family’ as a result. 2. You’ll get to meet people at all levels of expertise and stature in the world of speaking in Southern Africa and (if you attend international conventions) also around the world. 3. You’ll get to hear and meet selected international speakers and benefit from their expertise when they come to Southern Africa, which they do. 4. You’ll find a community of extraordinarily generous, open-hearted and helpful PSASA members, who will give you every assistance they can to start, develop and grow your own speaking career. 5. You’ll develop a network of contacts and access to speaker bureaus that will extend the scope of your marketing and prospecting. 6. You’ll have the opportunity as a membership benefit, to attend regular workshops or MasterClasses run on various topics by subject matter experts. 7. You’ll be able to share in the annual PSASA Convention. – Both locally and in all International Conventions world-wide (at the going fees of course) 8. You’ll be exposed to self-publishing, audio-book, DVD production and collateral ‘product’ information that will help you grow the suite of services and products you can offer your clients. 9. You’ll be given (if you’re good enough!) the opportunity to strut your stuff in front of a critical but supportive peer group. 10. You’ll benefit from having your details on the PSASA website. Google will find you more easily. 11. Membership of the PSASA is a sought-after credential. It tells clients that you’ve signed off on a code of professionalism and conduct and that they can expect value and quality for their money. 12. If...